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That Viral Anti-Nazi Sign On Those Tiki Torches Is Actually From Funny Or Die

"I didn't want anyone who works there getting in any kind of trouble over it," the sign's maker told BuzzFeed News.

Posted on August 15, 2017, at 1:37 p.m. ET

If you've been on social media recently, you've probably seen this photo:

"Please do not use these Tiki torches for any racist crap, you Nazi assholes," the note states. "They're for BBQs with friends, family, and your neighbor Steve with the lazy eye who kinda creeps everyone out but he always brings his killer homemade guac so you deal with his weird vibes because it's easier than learning how to make guacamole."

The note was a response to the white supremacist riots in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend, and the dozens of Tiki torches the demonstrators carried during a march.

An alt right, white nationalist torch rally met by counter protest led to fist fights, pepper spray in… https://t.co/Ww0j9DXrjM

Many people on Twitter mocked the white supremacists for using the torches.

They sell those torches at Party City. These dudes probably all went to Party City together.

Nothing says "I'm defending white culture" like carrying a Tiki Torch.

The response even prompted the manufacturer of the torches, Tiki Brand, to release a statement denouncing their use in Charlottesville.

Facebook: TIKIBrand

When the photo of the note calling Nazis "assholes" was uploaded to Reddit, it quickly went viral, rocketing to the front page and picking up nearly 75,000 upvotes.

From Reddit, it made its way to Twitter. This tweet has over 100,000 retweets.

However, BuzzFeed News has confirmed that the image was actually published (and created) by Funny Or Die on Monday afternoon.

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Senior social content producer at Funny Or Die — and creator of the sign —

Dashiell Driscoll told BuzzFeed News he wrote up, printed out, and manually taped the sign to Tiki torches at a large chain hardware store in Hollywood.

"The whole thing, from thinking of the idea, to posting it, was probably about an hour and 15 minutes," he said. "It was just one sign and I took it with me. I didn't want anyone who works there getting in any kind of trouble over it."

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