Pride Was A Riot — And LGBTQ Demonstrators Around The World Are Still Fighting For Equality

Rights for the LGBTQ community in the United States have come a long way — but that isn't the case everywhere in the world.

The first Pride marches were held in 1970, a year after the Stonewall riots in New York City. Over the last 50 years, Pride has turned from a solemn response to police brutality and discrimination against the LGBTQ community into a celebration of what it means to be queer.

Rights for the LGBTQ community in the United States have come a long way — but that isn't the case everywhere in the world.

People's rights are still quashed by anti-LGBTQ governments, and in countries like Iran, Myanmar, and Uganda, being gay is still considered illegal.

We looked at 10 years of Pride marches around the world to remind ourselves that, for many people, Pride is still a riot.

A person holding a pride flag walks the opposite direction of police
A protester talks to a line of police officers while onlookers capture it with their smartphones
A police officer holding a baton runs after protesters
Officers surround and try to remove protesters sitting and lying on the ground
An activist shouts while lying on the ground, surrounded by other people standing
Officers kneel next to a kid holding a crucifix
A protester is being pulled from a cab by their face
A protester holds up a sign that says "Le-gay-lize"


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