25 Years Later, These Photos Of Biggie's Funeral Are Still Devastating

It's been 25 years since Notorious B.I.G. was killed. These photos look at the life and tragic death of the legendary New York rapper.

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Rapper Notorious B.I.G., aka Biggie Smalls, aka Chris Wallace, rolls a cigar outside his mother's house in Brooklyn.

The Notorious B.I.G. Biggie Smalls. Big Poppa. These were some of the names Christopher Wallace went by. No matter how people refer to him, his impact on hip-hop is felt to this day.

March 9, 2022, marked 25 years since Wallace, 24, was shot and killed in Los Angeles during an ambush at an intersection. Many people wondered who was responsible and why Biggie was targeted, and some have theorized that it was retaliation for the fatal shooting of Tupac Shakur months earlier. None of these claims were substantial, and the person who shot and killed Wallace is still not known.

Wallace, a Brooklyn native, rose to the top of the hip-hop world with his 1994 debut album, Ready to Die, which featured songs such as “Big Poppa,” “Juicy,” and “Warning.” The album is iconic, and some of its tracks received several accolades, such as a Grammy nomination for Best Rap Solo Performance for “Big Poppa.” Recently, Rolling Stone ranked it at No. 22 on its list of the top 500 albums of all time. Ready to Die was the only solo album he released while he was alive. Two weeks after he was killed, his second album, Life After Death, was released. At his funeral on March 18, 1997, thousands gathered in Brooklyn’s Clinton Hill, the neighborhood where Wallace grew up, to catch a glimpse of the hearse carrying the rapper.

These photos look at Biggie's life and tragic death.


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Notorious B.I.G. aka Biggie Smalls performs at the Urban Aid charity show at Madison Square Garden in New York on Oct. 5, 1995.

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In this Dec. 6, 1995, file photo, the Notorious B.I.G., who won rap artist and rap single of the year, clutches his awards at the podium during the Billboard Music Awards in New York.

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Biggie Smalls with Junior Mafia outside his mother's house in Brooklyn.

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Police, neighbors, and fans wait and watch as the funeral caravan for Biggie passes through the Brooklyn neighborhood of Clinton Hill, where he grew up and first started rapping.

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Rapper Lil' Kim of Junior Mafia is consoled by Mary J. Blige following funeral services for Biggie outside the Campbell Funeral Home.

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Pallbearers wheel Biggie's casket to the hearse after his funeral on March 18, 1997, in New York.

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Biggie's funeral procession passes fans and police on St. James Place in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn in New York City on March 18, 1997.

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Biggie's Clinton Hill neighborhood comes out to watch his funeral procession drive by on March 18, 1997.

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People in Biggie's Clinton Hill neighborhood gather to watch his funeral procession drive by on March 18, 1997.

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Police officers stand as crowds of people wait to witness Biggie's funeral procession drive by on March 18, 1997, in Brooklyn's Clinton Hill neighborhood.

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Unidentified members of the funeral caravan for Biggie pass through the Brooklyn neighborhood of Clinton Hill, where he grew up and first started rapping.

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Fans and friends of Biggie Smalls from his old neighborhood turn out to pay their final respects as his funeral procession winds down St. James' Place in Brooklyn.

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People in Biggie's Clinton Hill neighborhood pay tribute to him during his funeral procession in Brooklyn.

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A woman wearing a mask jogs past a mural of Biggie created by Sipros Naberezny on March 10, 2021, in New York City.