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9 Photo Stories That Will Challenge Your View Of The World

Here are some of the most interesting and powerful photo stories from across the internet.

Posted on July 31, 2021, at 8:00 a.m. ET

Have you become strangely invested in doubles table tennis this last week? Synchronized diving? Volleyball? You're not alone. We have all been glued to our screens during the Tokyo Olympics, whether it's for swimming or gymnastics. We were happy to hear Simone Biles is taking care of herself with the support of her team, and we also looked back at some of her more gravity-defying feats to remind you why she's the GOAT. Over at CNN, they rounded up 25 of the most exciting athletes to watch during the Games.

We also had the pleasure of speaking with Kathy Willens this week, who recently retired after a 45-year career as a photojournalist with the Associated Press; while Hailey Sadler, with support from Border Kindness, shared moving photographs of migrants living in limbo after they were deported to Mexico.

Also this week, Michael Sherwin hopes to change how we view the US landscape and our history with his project Vanishing Points, which looks at Native American sites of sacred and historical importance across the country. Zohra Bensemra looked at how some self-sufficient Senegalese are creating and sustaining gardens in the desert, and photographic artist Bindi Vora interpreted the pandemic in collage. Arthur Lubow wrote about his discovery of the revered Chilean photographer Sergio Larrain almost a decade ago.

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"These Simone Biles Pictures Exist to Remind You Why She's the GOAT" — BuzzFeed News

Simone Biles of Team United States competes in the Olympics, shown upside down midflip on a balance beam
Ezra Shaw / Getty Images

"Photographs of Asylum-Seekers on Their Journey to Another Life" — BuzzFeed News

A migrant mother and son sit on a folding chair on a black background, embracing and looking at the camera
Hailey Sadler

"25 Athletes to Watch in the Tokyo Olympics" — CNN

An Olympic rock climber hangs from a wall with a rope securing her
Fabrice Coffrini / AFP via Getty Images

"A Photographer Reflected on Her 45-Year Career and What Has Changed" — BuzzFeed News

Mourner at funeral for Haitian drowning victims holds her head in her hand
Kathy Willens / AP

"Stumbling Upon Greatness: Discovering Sergio Larrain" — The New York Times

A young couple on a boat, with a sail above them and the woman smiling
Sergio Larrain / Magnum Photos

"These Photos Capture the Native American History That's All Over the US" — BuzzFeed News

An older couple at a railing stare out at Butte Monuments in Monument Valley
Michael Sherwin

"Senegalese Plant Circular Gardens in Green Wall Defence Against Desert" — Reuters

An overhead shot of a large series of circles carved into farmland, with people and solar panels nearby
Zohra Bensemra / Reuters

"Mountain of Salt: A COVID Commentary From Found Images — in Pictures" — The Guardian

A collage of four young people looking at a globe, with two circles and a square over them
© Bindi Vora


A BuzzFeed News investigation, in partnership with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, based on thousands of documents the government didn't want you to see.