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Olivia Rodrigo Is Being Accused Of Talking In A “Blaccent” And Using AAVE In These Resurfaced Videos And It’s Sparked Mixed Reactions

The 18-year-old singer can be seen talking in an accentuated blaccent and utilizing AAVE slang in some resurfaced clips from an Instagram livestream earlier this year.

Posted on July 29, 2021, at 11:19 a.m. ET

Olivia Rodrigo is currently at the center of discussion on Twitter, after some fans accused her of “constantly” using AAVE in a series of resurfaced clips that went viral on Wednesday.

Dave J Hogan / Dave J Hogan / Getty Images

In the resurfaced compilation, the “Drivers License” singer can be seen on various Instagram livestreams playfully interacting with her fans and using phrases central to African American Vernacular English, or AAVE.

olivia rodrigo constantly uses AAVE and it is pissing me off. the blaccent…

@beytilldawn / Via twitter.com

She says things like “I be trending” and “emotional AF” while also adopting contractions common in AAVE such as “y’all” and “imma” and speaking in what is referred to as a “blaccent.”

It appears that the majority of the clips in the compilation were from earlier in the year, around the release of "Drivers License."

As well as the video compilation, a thread of Olivia’s tweets from 2020 and early 2021 where she uses AAVE slang terms like “homegirl,” “crine,” and “yung” is also making the rounds on Twitter too.

@beytilldawn / Via Twitter: @beytilldawn

​​When the resurfaced clips began circulating across social media, many fans were surprised and said that Olivia should "take accountability" for the appropriation, and "address" her past comments.

Many people were quick to highlight the "double standard" perpetuated by Olivia freely using AAVE, saying that while it's "trendy" for non-Black people to adopt such slang, Black people are still victims of discrimination for speaking the same way.

“I think the problem here is the double standard,” one person wrote. “it's cool and trendy for non-black people to talk like that but black people are still scolded for using aave even though they invented it.”

@neeuskens @beytilldawn I think the problem here is the double standard... it's cool and trendy for non-black people to talk like that but black people are still scolded for using aave even though they invented it

Via twitter.com

“I can see why ppl don’t think it’s that serious, but for me this is just annoying bc at the end of the day black folks definitely get discriminated against for using AAVE,” another tweeted. “Technically she’s not hurting anyone BUT she is perpetuating some mess.”

@beytilldawn I can see why ppl don’t think it’s that serious, but for me this is just annoying bc at the end of the day black folks definitely get discriminated against for using AAVE. Technically she’s not hurting anyone BUT she is perpetuating some mess and imma DOG HER for it 🥴

Via twitter.com

“Do you know how many black kids at my school were told they’ll never have or never amount to anything because they talk like this,” another wrote.

@beytilldawn @GaurangiMalhot2 Do you know how many black kids at my school were told they’ll never have or never amount to anything because they talk like this.

Via twitter.com

Some people drew comparisons with Billie Eilish, who just last month was at the center of criticism after revealing that she related to a cartoon character who was notorious for using a blaccent and appropriating Black culture.

Scott Dudelson / Getty Images

One person tweeted that the internet “dragged” Billie Eilish “through hell and back” for doing “the same thing” as Olivia, while another tweeted that they were “holding both accountable.”

And some people compared Olivia’s accent and mannerisms in these clips with her demeanor when she recently visited the White House. One person tweeted that “she most definitely didn't sound like this when she was with [President Joe Biden].”

The Washington Post / The Washington Post via Getty Images

However, many people came to Olivia’s defense.

Jmenternational / JMEnternational for BRIT Awards / Getty Images

Many commented that the slang used by Olivia is common across social media and particularly on TikTok, and that often those who use it aren't actually aware of its origins or of AAVE in general.

One person tweeted that while they “understand where everyone is coming from,” they believe that this slang mainly comes “from social media” and has consequently been “adapted into so many ppls vocab.”

@beytilldawn though i understand where everyone is coming from on this, i do believe a lot of this slang shes using is coming from social media (mostly tiktok) these days, and i feel like it’s adapted into so many ppls vocab. you cant stray from it :/ (coming from a black woman)

Via twitter.com

“Do people not realise, if you are brought up in an environment where everyone is using words like “homegirl, gurl, sis, etc etc” people are bound to pick up something,” another wrote. “Making this an issue when it shouldn’t be. Please touch grass.”

Do people not realise, if you are brought up in an environment where everyone is using words like “homegirl, gurl, sis, etc etc” people are bound to pick up something. Making this an issue when it shouldn’t be. Please touch grass. https://t.co/wBQXI0ZVmO

Via twitter.com

One person tweeted: ​​"Olivia is a kid that’s growing up in a time where black culture is influencing society so much to the point where people don’t even know that they are being influenced by black culture… ‘Gen z slang’ is literally mostly just AAVE getting more and more popular."

@nilahmonai / Via twitter.com

And many pointed out that other celebrities have adopted the same mannerisms, yet received little to no backlash for it.

Some people mentioned Ariana Grande’s trademark use of AAVE slang and a blaccent — which she has been called out for in the past — and questioned why Olivia is now being dragged for something that other artists seem to get away with.

Steve Granitz / WireImage

“That's like half of Ari’s songs. She has literal songs that are basically in AAVE and y’all don’t care,” one person tweeted.

Ariana stans (that like to call her black) calling out Olivia and Camila for those tweets is so funny and ironic. Like honey, that’s like half of Ari’s songs. She has literal songs that are basically in AAVE and y’all don’t care. Y’all just pretend you do bc y’all don’t like them

Via twitter.com

BuzzFeed News has contacted a spokesperson for Olivia Rodrigo for comment.

A BuzzFeed News investigation, in partnership with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, based on thousands of documents the government didn't want you to see.