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Here's How To Use Snapchat's Map To Go On A Mini World Vacation

Now you can see snaps from strangers all over the world.

Posted on June 23, 2017, at 5:36 p.m. ET

Snapchat just launched its new Map feature this week, which lets you see snaps from strangers around the world.

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Here's how to access it: in camera mode, pinch to zoom out – this magically opens the map (I know, right? Pinch-to-zoom-out isn't really an intuitive way to access this feature.)

It also shows you were all your friends are – which can be pretty creepy! Here's how to turn off the tracking feature and go into "ghost mode."

But enough about your boring friends. Let's talk about the part where you can see people around the world.

It's truly magical. There's nothing else quite like this that lets you check out specific locations around the globe and peek in on the everyday lives of normal people. Snooping around to see what people in the Arctic circle were up to, then what teens in Saudi Arabia are doing, is transcendently heartwarming in an "I love humanity!!!!" kind of way.

After you open the map, tap on the glowing blue orbs to see snaps. When there's a lot of snaps in one area, it glows red.

Obviously, in places that are less densely populated, or in parts of the world with fewer smartphones, there are fewer glowing blue orbs. But this will probably grow more and more, as people update their apps and turn on the feature.

Obviously, in places that are less densely populated, or in parts of the world with fewer smartphones, there are fewer glowing blue orbs. But this will probably grow more and more, as people update their apps and turn on the feature.

Here are some of the great things I found just scrolling around the map.

A woman filling her water bottle straight from a melted glacier in Juneau, Alaska.

A moose wandering the neighborhood in Anchorage, AK.

A bright summer day in Greenland.

A woman eating oysters on the northern tip of Norway.

Kids petting deer in Japan.

Soldiers fooling around in South Korea.

Someone in the Philippines listening to the new Lorde album.

A boxing match in the Philippines.

A snowy, scary rickety bridge in the very southern tip of Chile.

Beer pong in Christchurch, New Zealand.

A kangaroo hanging out in someone's yard in Tasmania.

A guy rolling a joint in Perth, Australia.

A traditional dance performance in Yerevan, Armenia.

A guy doing a backflip off a yacht in Crete, Greece.

Someone on Rikers Island (NYC's prison).

A guy doing headstands on the gym equipment in Sri Lanka.

A giant sea turtle at the beach in Sri Lanka.

Teens dancing in their classroom in Angola.

A hookah bar in Kinshasa, The Democratic Republic of the Congo.

A parade in Trinidad and Tobago.

And a parade with a stilt king thing (there's someone inside it walking around) in Spain.

Someone making a cranberry and Jägermeister at a music festival in Paris, France.

A fashion show in Iraq.

Fish tanks in Hong Kong.

A waterpark in Lucknow, India.

One of the most active spots (on the map it's bright red) is the Kaaba, a religious site in Mecca, Saudia Arabia.

And there you go: traveling the world without ever having to deal with the TSA.

  • Picture of Katie Notopoulos

    Katie Notopoulos is a senior editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in New York. Notopoulos writes about tech and internet culture and is cohost of the Internet Explorer podcast.

    Contact Katie Notopoulos at katie@buzzfeed.com.

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