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Downloadable Amazon Prime Videos Great For Harried Parents Who Work At Amazon

Now you can download shows like Transparent to watch offline.

Last updated on July 3, 2018, at 1:24 p.m. ET

Posted on September 1, 2015, at 9:00 a.m. ET

A scene from Transparent, an Amazon original series.
Amazon

A scene from Transparent, an Amazon original series.

Good news for Amazon Prime subscribers: The company is making Prime Instant Videos available for offline viewing -- everything from TV shows and movies to Amazon original series like Transparent.

What this means practically is that people who've paid the $99 annual for Amazon's Prime membership program can download streaming video to view in places where there's no internet connection. Or, if you're an Amazon employee reportedly slugging through a 100 hour workweek, you can sneak a few episodes of Entourage before that meeting where you ritualistically wrestle your colleagues until blood is drawn -- without logging into company Wifi and possibly tipping off management.

In addition to the hilarious and Emmy-winning HBO show Entourage, Amazon is also making a bunch of children's shows available for offline viewing (although most pediatricians say it's never too early to introduce your kids to the wild antics of E, Turtle, Ari, and Johnny Drama). This is especially great if you're an Amazon employee who doesn't see your children as much as you'd like thanks to your reportedly grueling work schedule at the company. While you might have a tough time appeasing Madison and Avery after missing their ballet recital AGAIN, you can take solace in the fact that they will just LOVE watching the live-action kids series Gortimer Gibbon's Life on Normal Street whenever they want after downloading it to their Kindle Fires (slightly discounted at the company store when you pay with scrip*).

As Ari Gold, the hilariously high strung agent played by Jeremy Piven (Pivster, to his friends) would say on Entourage, "hey, that's a-ok!"

HBO

*I have no knowledge that Amazon employees actually get discounts on Kindles or that there is company scrip. But did not having first hand knowledge of how to produce a movie stop Vinnie Chase when he wanted to make Medellin? No, no it didn't.

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    Katie Notopoulos is a senior editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in New York. Notopoulos writes about tech and internet culture and is cohost of the Internet Explorer podcast.

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