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Meet The New Bells Of Notre Dame

The nine bells, replacing Notre Dame's famously out-of-tune set, were made the medieval way. (With FIRE.)

Posted on February 4, 2013, at 1:56 p.m. ET

On Saturday, the Notre-Dame de Paris Cathedral welcomed nine new bells, in celebration of the cathedral's upcoming 850th anniversary (March 23).

GONZALO FUENTES / Reuters

The bells were designed to have the same weight, diameter, and sound as Notre Dame's bells from the French Revolution, which were melted and used as cannons.

GONZALO FUENTES / Reuters

This is the French bell foundry in Normandy where seven of the bells were made.

CHARLES PLATIAU / Reuters

The foundry, Cornille Havard, was reportedly chosen because it uses medieval casting methods.

CHARLES PLATIAU / Reuters
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Here, the workers make the "Anne-Genevieve" bell...

CHARLES PLATIAU / Reuters

...while Bishop Bernard Lagoutte and father Frank Bajada watch over.

CHARLES PLATIAU / Reuters
CHARLES PLATIAU / Reuters
CHARLES PLATIAU / Reuters
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Another bell, the "Benoit Joseph," was protected in the corner. "Anne-Genevieve" was the last bell to be made.

CHARLES PLATIAU / Reuters

On Jan. 31, the bells were transported to Notre Dame.

Francois Mori / AP
Francois Mori / AP
JACQUES DEMARTHON / Getty Images
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This bell — the largest of the nine — reportedly weighs 6 tons and plays in G-sharp.

JACQUES DEMARTHON / Getty Images
JACQUES DEMARTHON / Getty Images

Next up, the "Gabriel."

CHARLES PLATIAU / Reuters

Each bell has a unique look and pattern. But all have the same inscription — "Via viatores quaerit," Latin for "I am the path looking for travelers."

CHARLES PLATIAU / Reuters
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