Skip To Content
BuzzFeed News Home Reporting To You

This Is What's Happening In Egypt A Year After Its First Democratic Presidential Election

According to figures from protest leaders, nearly double the number of people who voted for Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi a year ago Sunday want him to step down.

Posted on June 30, 2013, at 6:23 p.m. ET

Hundreds of thousands of people protested against Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi Sunday, according to Al Jazeera English.

Morsi became Egypt's first democratically elected president exactly a year ago Sunday, but people want him to step down.

Morsi's critics say since he took office, the country has become more polarized between him and his Islamist allies pitted against seculars, liberals, moderate Muslims and Christians.

Protest organizers say more than 22 million people have signed their petition demanding Morsi step down.

Getty

This is what things looked like in Tahrir Square in Cairo.

AP / Manu Brabo

Security sources told the Guardian at least four people were killed and about 200 were injured.

Some protesters have been holding red cards that say "out."

Getty / KHALED DESOUKI
Reuters / KHALED DESOUKI

And many of them carry Egyptian flags.

Reuters / MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY
Getty / GIANLUIGI GUERCIA
Getty / GIANLUIGI GUERCIA
AP / Manu Brabo
Getty / KHALED DESOUKI
AP / Hassan Ammar
Getty / GIANLUIGI GUERCIA

Here a protester carries a flag with "leave" written on it in Arabic.

Reuters / ASMAA WAGUIH

Morsi also has plenty of supporters. Here, supporters near a mosque in Nasr City rally for the president.

Reuters / SUHAIB SALEM
Reuters / SUHAIB SALEM

According to the Associated Press there is a sense that if the protests don't force Morsi out, the opposition will lose momentum. "Honestly, if (Sunday) is not a game changer, we might all just pack up our bags and leave," one blogger said.

Getty / GIANLUIGI GUERCIA

Morsi told The Guardian he will not step down, saying if he steps down there will be opposition to whoever takes his place as well.

AP / Amr Nabil

Organizers planned June 30 to be the day to protest. People used the hashtag #June30 to tag their photos of the protest. These posters read "June 30, come, Egyptians are not afraid anymore."

AP / Hassan Ammar

ADVERTISEMENT