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Greek Protesters Lob Firebombs At Police, Police Respond With Tear Gas

All of this is taking place outside of Greece's Parliament, where a vote is being held over a bailout plan for the country.

Posted on July 15, 2015, at 3:37 p.m. ET

Thousands of protesters gathered outside of Greece's Parliament building on Wednesday ahead of a crucial vote over whether to accept the terms of a bailout package the country needs to stay afloat.

Jean-paul Pelissier / Reuters

The marches throughout the day were peaceful, despite the huge outcry against the fiscal reforms that the deal negotiated on Sunday mandates. As night fell, a much smaller group of protesters lobbed dozens of Molotov cocktails at the assembled police.

Yannis Behrakis / Reuters

"Police responded with tear gas, sending hundreds of people fleeing in central Syntagma Square," Reuters reported. There were no reports of injuries on either side during the confrontation.

Emilio Morenatti / AP

The vote inside the parliament is sure to prove fiery as well, though less literally. The package that Greece's creditors have offered strongly resembles one that Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras and Greek voters previously rejected.

Yannis Behrakis / Reuters

But Greece on Tuesday gained an unexpected ally in the form of the International Monetary Fund, one of Greece's main creditors along with the European Commission and European Central Bank.

In a newly released document, the IMF declared that it would not participate in any funding of a Greek bailout, or monitoring of how that money is spent, without huge amounts of debt relief for Athens. That very point had been one of the primary demands of Tsipras' government and one that Germany and other European countries have been loathe to agree to, leaving the status of the Greek bailout package uncertain.
Emilio Morenatti / AP

In a newly released document, the IMF declared that it would not participate in any funding of a Greek bailout, or monitoring of how that money is spent, without huge amounts of debt relief for Athens. That very point had been one of the primary demands of Tsipras' government and one that Germany and other European countries have been loathe to agree to, leaving the status of the Greek bailout package uncertain.

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