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Travis Scott And Drake Are Being Sued For Negligence And “Inciting The Crowd” At The Astroworld Festival That Killed At Least 8 Fans

One injured fan said that the Astroworld disaster was a direct result of “a motivation for profit at the expense of concertgoers’ health and safety” and the “encouragement of violence.”

Last updated on November 8, 2021, at 4:42 p.m. ET

Posted on November 8, 2021, at 11:49 a.m. ET

Three fans who say they sustained injuries at the Astroworld Festival have filed lawsuits in the wake of the disaster, which left eight people dead.

Astroworld attendees sign a makeshift memorial at the NRG Park grounds on Nov. 6.
Thomas Shea / AFP via Getty Images

Travis Scott, who produced and headlined the event, has been named in all three lawsuits.

Travis Scott performing onstage during the third annual Astroworld Festival at NRG Park on November 5.
Erika Goldring / WireImage

Eight people, ranging in age from 14 to 27, died at the event, and 13 others reportedly remain in the hospital with critical injuries.

Fan laying flowers at the makeshift memorial located at NRG Park on November 6, 2021.
Thomas Shea / AFP via Getty Images

The timeline of events that led to the fatalities still remains unclear, but attendee videos and witness testimonies appear to indicate that fans were being crushed in the overcrowded space as concertgoers surged toward the stage during Scott’s performance.

ppl were literally screaming bloody murder asking for help right there. #AstroWorld #ASTROFEST rip to all those who lost their life last night, it’s shouldn’t have turned out that way.

Twitter: @tre5pix

Manuel Souza, who said he was injured during the chaos, was the first to file a lawsuit in the aftermath of the “mass casualty” incident that took place on Friday evening.

The stage at Astroworld Festival during Travis Scott's headlining performance on November 5, 2021
Erika Goldring / WireImage

In the legal complaint, filed on Saturday in Harris County District Court and obtained by BuzzFeed News, Souza sued Scott, ScoreMore, and Live Nation — the concert company responsible for organizing the event.

Travis Scott performing onstage during the third annual Astroworld Festival at NRG Park on November 5, 2021.
Rick Kern / Getty Images

The lawsuit says that the festival organizers blatantly ignored potential warning signs that compromised the safety of the event even before performances had started.

The stage at Astroworld Festival during Travis Scott's headlining performance on November 5, 2021.
Erika Goldring / WireImage,

Souza’s account echoes a number of witness videos that were circulated on social media over the weekend, showing concertgoers as they “breached a security gate around the park, stampeded into the premises, and trampled over one another” earlier in the day.

As we were arriving to the Astroworld Festival at NRG Park right at 2:00, a stampede burst through the gates. Hundreds of people destroyed the VIP security entrance, bypassing the checkpoint. People were trampled. Some were detained. (Excuse any language you may hear)

Twitter: @MycahABC13

The suit continues to lay blame on the show’s organizers for allowing Scott’s performance to continue even after ambulances had arrived to treat attendees who had “suffered serious obvious injury.”

Travis Scott performing onstage during the third annual Astroworld Festival at NRG Park on November 5, 2021.
Erika Goldring / WireImage

Steve Kherkher, Souza’s attorney, claims that those in charge of the event were aware of “the extreme risk of harm to concertgoers that was escalating by the moment” and still “made the conscious decision to let the show go on.”

Travis Scott performing onstage during the third annual Astroworld Festival at NRG Park on November 5, 2021.
Rick Kern / Getty Images

“Eventually, due to the defendants’ active decision to let the show go on, the scene devolved into a complete melee, resulting in the needless, untimely death of at least 8 people and injuries to scores of others,” the suit says.

Travis Scott performing onstage during the third annual Astroworld Festival at NRG Park on November 5, 2021.
Erika Goldring / WireImage

Souza’s complaint ultimately alleges that the tragic incident was a direct consequence of “a motivation for profit at the expense of concertgoers’ health and safety” and the “encouragement of violence” by Scott himself.

Travis Scott performing onstage during the third annual Astroworld Festival at NRG Park on November 5, 2021.
Erika Goldring / WireImage

The complaint accuses the organizers of negligence and gross negligence, and is seeking at least $1 million in damages. Souza is also asking for a temporary restraining order against the event organizers to prevent any destruction of evidence.

Fans at makeshift memorial at NRG Park on November 6, 2021.
Thomas Shea / AFP via Getty Images

Since Souza’s complaint, subsequent lawsuits from other reportedly injured concertgoers have surfaced, with attorney Ben Crump announcing on Monday that he's also representing further victims.

Fans sign makeshift memorial at NRG Park on November 6, 2021.
Thomas Shea / AFP via Getty Images

Like Souza, Kristian Paredes and Patrick Stennis are suing Scott, Live Nation, and ScoreMore for negligence.

Travis Scott at the MTV VMAs on September 12, 2021.
Angela Weiss / AFP via Getty Images

However, Paredes's lawsuit also says that rapper Drake, who performed at the event, “came on stage alongside Travis Scott and helped incite the crowd” before the fatal crush.

Prince Williams / WireImage

Drake performs onstage during the Final Stop of 'Aubrey & The three Amigos Tour' at State Farm Arena on November 18, 2018.

According to the filing obtained by BuzzFeed News, Paredes’s suit appears to pin blame on the artists by suggesting that “they either were aware, or should've been aware, of the reaction the crowd would have and did have.”

Joseph Okpako / WireImage

Drake performs surprise set on Day 1 of Wireless Festival 2021 at Crystal Palace on September 10, 2021 in London, England.

The complaint also notes that Scott’s history of allowing and encouraging chaos at his concerts should have been taken into account by organizers in the planning of the festival.

Travis Scott performing onstage during the third annual Astroworld Festival at NRG Park on November 5, 2021.
Rick Kern / Getty Images

In his rise to prominence in the music industry, Scott has become known for hosting notoriously rowdy live performances, where concertgoers are encouraged to “rage” in the crowd and participate in mosh pits and crowd-surfing.

Travis Scott accepts award for 'Best Hip-Hop Video' at the MTV VMAs on September 12, 2021.
Mike Coppola / Getty Images for MTV/ViacomCBS

In the wake of Friday events, many have also pointed out that Scott's song lyrics also appear to “encourage violence and injury at his shows.” In one 2018 song, titled "Stargazing," Scott raps, “And it ain’t a mosh pit if ain’t no injuries / I got ’em stage-diving out the nosebleeds.”

Rich Fury / Getty Images

Travis Scott performs on stage during Rolling Loud at Hard Rock Stadium on July 24, 2021 in Miami Gardens, Florida.

The lyrics are an apparent reference to an incident in 2017, which began recirculating on social media over the weekend, when Scott appeared to encourage a fan to jump off a balcony at his show in New York.

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In fact, an attorney for a man who was left partially paralyzed after a Travis Scott concert in the same year said that the events at Astroworld this weekend were tragic but not surprising given Scott’s history of inciting chaos at his shows.

Bertrand Rindoff Petroff / Getty Images

Travis Scott at the Dior Homme Menswear Spring Summer 2022 show as part of Paris Fashion Week on June 25, 2021 in Paris, France.

“Make no mistake about it, his desire for chaos caused this horrific tragedy,” attorney Howard Hershenhorn told BuzzFeed News.

Fans sign makeshift memorial at NRG Park on November 6, 2021.
Thomas Shea / AFP via Getty Images

And Scott has been held accountable in the past, with him pleading guilty to misdemeanor charges on two occasions in connection with his live performances.

Travis Scott performs on stage during Rolling Loud at Hard Rock Stadium on July 24, 2021 in Miami Gardens, Florida.
Rich Fury / Getty Images

In 2015, Scott pled guilty to charges of reckless conduct after he reportedly encouraged fans to climb over security barricades and mount the stage at the Lollapalooza festival in Chicago.

Travis Scott performing onstage during the third annual Astroworld Festival at NRG Park on November 5, 2021.
Erika Goldring / WireImage

And two years later, according to the Associated Press, he was accused of inciting a riot at a performance in Arkansas after he encouraged fans to push past security. Multiple people were injured as a result, and he was later charged with disorderly conduct.

Travis Scott performing onstage during the third annual Astroworld Festival at NRG Park on November 5, 2021.
Rick Kern / Getty Images

In fact, this night was documented in Scott's 2019 Netflix film, Look Mom I Can Fly, which captured the events that led up to his arrest, as well as his eventual release from jail.

Netflix

On his way home from jail, Scott can be heard acknowledging those who were injured during his show, explaining that he felt bad about “kids getting hurt and shit.”

Netflix

And the Netflix film goes on to directly address the chaotic culture that has bound itself to Scott's live shows. In one scene before the Arkansas performance that led to his arrest, a member of Scott’s team can be seen explaining to venue staff and security that they should expect mayhem and injuries in the crowd.

Netflix

“Kids push up against the front and spread all the way across that and fill in the whole front floor,” he says. "So the pressure becomes very great up against the barricade."

Netflix

“You will see a lot of crowd surfers in general, but also you’ll see a lot of kids that are just trying to get out and get to safety because they can’t breathe, it’s so compact,” he goes on.

Netflix

He continues, “You won’t know how bad it could be with our crowd until we turn it on.”

Netflix

A montage from the film’s opening 10 minutes depicts footage from his live performances, the chaos of the crowd seemingly glorified by one attendee who called his experience “mental,” before adding that he “thought [he] was going to die” within the mayhem.

Netflix

In a statement issued on Saturday, Scott said he was “absolutely devastated” by the events that took place at Astroworld on Friday and pledged his commitment to “heal and support the families in need.”

Twitter: @trvisXX

BuzzFeed News has reached out to a representative for Travis Scott for comment.

A BuzzFeed News investigation, in partnership with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, based on thousands of documents the government didn't want you to see.