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The Empire State Building Was Lit Up With Giant Photos Of Endangered Species

The display on Saturday night was designed to raise awareness of the plight of threatened species.

Last updated on July 3, 2018, at 1:22 p.m. ET

Posted on August 2, 2015, at 11:31 a.m. ET

On Saturday night, one of the most recognizable buildings in the world was looking a little different.

Craig Ruttle / AP

New York City's Empire State Building was lit up with a giant display of endangered animals.

Grant Lamos IV / Getty Images for The Oceanic Preservation Society

The results were stunning.

Grant Lamos IV / Getty Images for The Oceanic Preservation Society

People around the city stopped to gaze and take photos.

Grant Lamos IV / Getty Images for The Oceanic Preservation Society
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Amid the bright lights of the Manhattan skyline, the pictures of the animals certainly made a splash.

Craig Ruttle / AP

A closer view of the famous building showed just how big the pictures of the animals were.

Grant Lamos IV / Getty Images for The Oceanic Preservation Society

The Empire State Building is 1,250 feet tall, after all.

Grant Lamos IV / Getty Images for The Oceanic Preservation Society

The event was held to promtoe a new documentary, Racing Extinction

Grant Lamos IV / Getty Images for The Oceanic Preservation Society
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"We lit up the Empire State Building with the world's most beautiful -- and threatened -- species to show the world what's at stake," the filmmakers said on their website.

Grant Lamos IV / Getty Images for The Oceanic Preservation Society

Some 160 different threatened species were shown.

Grant Lamos IV / Getty Images for The Oceanic Preservation Society

Even Cecil the Lion, infamously killed by an American dentist in Zimbabwe last month, was projected on to the building.

Kena Betancur / AFP / Getty Images

This bald eagle certainly had the city feeling patriotic. πŸŒƒπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ

Craig Ruttle / AP

You can learn more about the fight to save these species here.

Craig Ruttle / AP
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